Costs	and	Benefits	of	Cross-Country	Labour	Migration	in	the	GMS
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Costs and Benefits of Cross-Country Labour Migration in the GMS

by Hossein Jalilian

International labour migration can be characterized in three ways — as human aspiration, tradition, and necessity. For some people, working overseas is a dream. For others, international labour mobility is a tradition. For a great number of people, however, international labour migration is an economic necessity. It is the only viable solution to realize their basic human right to a decent life. GMS worker movements to Thailand typify all three characterizations of international labour mobility. While this book focuses on the economic dimensions of international labour emigration, principally from Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam to Thailand, it recognizes at the very outset the equal standing of non-economic motivations for migration.

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Preliminary pages
1. Migrants of the Mekong: Wins and Losses
2. Economic Costs and Benefits of Labour Migration: Case of Cambodia
3. Economic Costs and Benefits of Labour Migration: Case of Lao PDR
4. Economic Costs and Benefits of Labour Migration: Case of Thailand
5. Economic Costs and Benefits of Labour Migration: Case of Vietnam
6. Migrants of the Mekong: Lessons
Index

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Product Details

  • Number of Pages : 416
  • Publisher : Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
  • Weight : 570g
  • Product Code : 9789814311892
  • Dimension : 152 x 229 mm

About Author

Hossein Jalilian

Hossein Jalilian is a reader in Economic Development at the University of Bradford. Over the period from April 2007–Sept 2010, on leave of absence from the University of Bradford, he was research director at Cambodia Development Resource Institute (CDRI), Cambodia.