Equal: How we fix the gender pay gap
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Equal: How we fix the gender pay gap

by Carrie Gracie

'Gracie tells the story of her struggle and eventual triumph as a way of encouraging us, of changing our society, of giving us all courage . . . Equal is a very important book' Sandi Toksvig Equal pay has been the law for half a century. But women often get paid less than men, even when they're doing equal work. Mostly they don't know because pay is secret. But what if a woman finds out? What should she do? In Equal, award-winning journalist Carrie Gracie covers her own experience of holding her employer - the BBC - to account and investigates why we're still being paid unequally. Equal will open your eyes, fix your resolve and give you the tools to act - and act now. 'Equal tells a personal story that changed the public debate' Guardian 'Pulls no punches' Sunday Times 'Full of sound advice for women' Observer 'A gripping personal story told with warmth and wit' Julia Gillard, former Australian Prime Minister Longlisted for the Financial Times Business Book of the Year Award 2019

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Product Details

  • Binding : Paperback / softback
  • Number of Pages : 288
  • Publisher : Virago Press Ltd
  • Publication Date : 2020-05-03
  • Weight : 220g
  • Product Code : 9780349012254
  • Dimension : 196 x 126 x 32 mm

About Author

Carrie Gracie

Carrie Gracie grew up in north east Scotland and set up a restaurant before completing a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Oxford. In a BBC career spanning more than three decades, she has served as China correspondent and Beijing bureau chief, presenter on the BBC News Channel and host of the weekly BBC World Service programme The Interview. She has made many documentaries for TV and radio, winning prizes including a Peabody and an Emmy, and commentating at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In January 2018, Gracie left her post as the BBC's China editor in protest at unequal pay, publishing an open letter to BBC audiences and giving evidence before a parliamentary committee. Six months later, she won an apology from the BBC. She donated all her back pay to the gender equality charity, the Fawcett Society, to help low-paid women facing pay discrimination. She continues to serve as a BBC News presenter, and as a member of the 'BBC Women' group, she campaigns for a more equal, fair and transparent pay structure at the national broadcaster.